• Barry

Discovery

Updated: Mar 8, 2018

It was hard not to find an instant pull to its universal theme of discovery


"...even when the world doesn’t validate who you are, there are avenues of support to help fight the darkness."


When I was approached several months ago to work on this project, I never knew what it would truly mean to me. I felt with the little spare time I had, I could volunteer and help a friend flesh out his production, but now, here am I am the producer of a fiscally sponsored film, building not only a professional skill set but a tribe that I will forever be bonded to. The Thornburgs have taken me in as one of their own, integrating me into their wonderful family and have granted me trust in the development of their story.

Transracial adoption was not common knowledge to me. Though it was obvious that adopting allowed the creation of diverse family structures, it honestly never transcended beyond a celebrity exposition. As I engaged in the life of Shalisa, Barry, and their children, and discovered the beauty of this story, it was hard not to find an instant pull to its universal theme of discovery.

Even though my story does not reflect that of a transracial adoptee, I can relate to the struggles of having an identity crisis. Being a person of color that navigated between both white and communities of color, I constantly felt caught in the middle of being too much or too little. It is a struggle, even when I’ve reached points of actualization, that consistently finds a way to creep back in as feelings of unworthiness and invalidity. Those feelings can take us into dark places, lead us to a point of hopeless isolation, but I think one thing that this film can show is that you are not alone. That even when the world doesn’t validate who you are, there are avenues of support to help fight the darkness.


Talking about support systems, where have you found your best avenue of support?